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Asked by Ambati

May 31, 2014

why H2O is liquid and H2S is gas at room temperature?

why H2O is liquid and H2S is gas at room temperature?

Answers(4)

Answer

Syeda

Member since Jan 25, 2017

Answer.


The ability of Oxygen atom to pull electrons is greater than of Sulfur i.e. O is more electronegetive than S. When an hydrogen is connected to an highly electronegative element like Oxygen (this usually happens with fluorine, oxygen, and nitrogen), it has higher intermolecular forces like Hydrogen bonding. Its a very strong bond that packs the water molecules closely together, forming a liquid while sulfur does not attract H nearly as strongly so they dissociate into a gas.      

Amarthya Pradeep

Member since

The ability of Oxygen atom to pull electrons is greater than of Sulfur i.e. O is more electronegetive than S. When an hydrogen is connected to an highly electronegative element like Oxygen (this usually happens with fluorine, oxygen, and nitrogen), it has higher intermolecular forces like Hydrogen bonding. Its a very strong bond that packs the water molecules closely together, forming a liquid while sulfur does not attract H nearly as strongly so they dissociate into a gas.

Manasa

Member since

In H2O,there is hydrogen bonding but in H2S there is no hydrogen bonding as Oxygen is more electronegative than sulphur

Shruti

Member since

Whether a compound will be a solid, liquid or gas at a given temperature can be explained by the attractive forces between its molecules. 

H2S (hydrogen sulfide) is a gas because at room temperature the forces and interactions between the molecules of hydrogen sulfide are very weak. 

The water molecule has a stronger dipole (a negatively and positively charged end to the individual molecule) so these negative and positive ends continually attract each other like magnets of opposite poles, creating more cohesion between the molecules of water--explaining the liquid phase.
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