Degrees of Comparison
When we want to compare two or more nouns using adjectives, we use the comparative and superlative forms of the adjective to show the comparison between the nouns. E.g. -
Honey is sweet, sugar is sweeter but victory is the sweetest.
In this sentence, we are comparing the three nouns using the positive, comparative and superlative forms of the word ‘sweet’.
There are three forms of adjectives used to show varying degrees of comparison:
  •  The positive,
  •  The comparative and
  •  The superlative.
The positive form is used when there is no direct comparison being made to anything specific, but is used to offer a broad or general comparison.
The comparative form is used when two things are being compared with each other.
The superlative form is used when more than two things are being compared with one another.

Regular forms for one and two syllable words.
positive – no change (big, strong, long, etc.)
comparative – words end in "er" (bigger, stronger, longer, etc.)
superlative – words end in "est" (biggest, strongest, longest, etc.)

Regular forms for three or more syllable words.
positive – no change (understandable, comfortable, etc.)
comparative – use "more" (more understandable, more comfortable, etc.)
superlative – use "most" (most understandable, most comfortable, etc.)
Adverbs that end in "ly" always use "more" or "most", such as "more quickly" or "most quickly"
 

Summary

When we want to compare two or more nouns using adjectives, we use the comparative and superlative forms of the adjective to show the comparison between the nouns. E.g. -
Honey is sweet, sugar is sweeter but victory is the sweetest.
In this sentence, we are comparing the three nouns using the positive, comparative and superlative forms of the word ‘sweet’.
There are three forms of adjectives used to show varying degrees of comparison:
  •  The positive,
  •  The comparative and
  •  The superlative.
The positive form is used when there is no direct comparison being made to anything specific, but is used to offer a broad or general comparison.
The comparative form is used when two things are being compared with each other.
The superlative form is used when more than two things are being compared with one another.

Regular forms for one and two syllable words.
positive – no change (big, strong, long, etc.)
comparative – words end in "er" (bigger, stronger, longer, etc.)
superlative – words end in "est" (biggest, strongest, longest, etc.)

Regular forms for three or more syllable words.
positive – no change (understandable, comfortable, etc.)
comparative – use "more" (more understandable, more comfortable, etc.)
superlative – use "most" (most understandable, most comfortable, etc.)
Adverbs that end in "ly" always use "more" or "most", such as "more quickly" or "most quickly"
 
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