Notes On Future Perfect Continuous Tense - CBSE Class 7 English Grammar
 
Future Perfect Continuous tense
 
It is used to express a continued or ongoing action that will start in future and is thought to be continued till sometime in future. (Remember, an ongoing action in future which will continue till some time in future). There will be a time reference, such as “since 1980, for three hours” from which the action will start in future and will continue.
 
 
                                 Structure of sentence.
 
Positive Sentence.
• Subject + Auxiliary verb + main verb (Present participle) + Object + Time reference
•Subject + will have been + (1st form of verb or base verb + ing) + object + time reference

Examples.
         I will have been waiting for him for one hour.
         She will have been playing football since 2015.
 
Negative Sentence.
• Subject +”Not” inside Auxiliary verbs + main verb (present participle) + Object +    Time reference
• Subject + will not have been + (1st form of verb or base verb + ing) + object +    Time reference
To make negative sentence, the word “not” is added inside auxiliary verb, so it becomes “will not have been”.

Examples.
         I will not have been waiting for him for one hour.
         She will not have been playing football since 2015.
         By the next year, I will have been working as a teacher for 30 years.
         We will be making a rest stop in half an hour, because you will have been driving the car for 6          hours by then.

 
Interrogative Sentence.
• Auxiliary verb + Subject + auxiliary verb + main verb (present participle) + object +    time reference

• Will + Subject + have been + (1st form of verb or base verb+ing) + object + time    reference
Interrogative sentence starts with auxiliary verb “will” and auxiliary verb “have been” is used after subject in sentence.

Examples.
        Will I have been waiting for him for one hour?
        Will she have been playing football since 2015?
 
 

Summary

 
Future Perfect Continuous tense
 
It is used to express a continued or ongoing action that will start in future and is thought to be continued till sometime in future. (Remember, an ongoing action in future which will continue till some time in future). There will be a time reference, such as “since 1980, for three hours” from which the action will start in future and will continue.
 
 
                                 Structure of sentence.
 
Positive Sentence.
• Subject + Auxiliary verb + main verb (Present participle) + Object + Time reference
•Subject + will have been + (1st form of verb or base verb + ing) + object + time reference

Examples.
         I will have been waiting for him for one hour.
         She will have been playing football since 2015.
 
Negative Sentence.
• Subject +”Not” inside Auxiliary verbs + main verb (present participle) + Object +    Time reference
• Subject + will not have been + (1st form of verb or base verb + ing) + object +    Time reference
To make negative sentence, the word “not” is added inside auxiliary verb, so it becomes “will not have been”.

Examples.
         I will not have been waiting for him for one hour.
         She will not have been playing football since 2015.
         By the next year, I will have been working as a teacher for 30 years.
         We will be making a rest stop in half an hour, because you will have been driving the car for 6          hours by then.

 
Interrogative Sentence.
• Auxiliary verb + Subject + auxiliary verb + main verb (present participle) + object +    time reference

• Will + Subject + have been + (1st form of verb or base verb+ing) + object + time    reference
Interrogative sentence starts with auxiliary verb “will” and auxiliary verb “have been” is used after subject in sentence.

Examples.
        Will I have been waiting for him for one hour?
        Will she have been playing football since 2015?
 
 
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