From Garrison Town to Empire
The Muslim rule in India started with the establishment of the Delhi Sultanate in 1206. Their control was limited to the fortified towns which depended on the areas beyond for supplies. When the areas on the outskirts refused to trade supplies, the rulers often plundered their own regions to obtain supplies for the fortified towns.

Under the reign of Ghiyasuddin Balban, Alauddin Khalji and Mohammed bin Tughluq the control was expanded over all the fortified towns and the areas surrounding them.

During 1296 to 1351, the Sultans conquered the external frontiers. The control of the Sultans had reached South India where they added elephants, horses to their armies, captured slaves and collected precious metal from the conquered regions.

Hunters-gatherers and nomadic herders were expelled from the forest. This land was cleared for farming and distributed amongst the peasants and agriculture. Regional trade was promoted alongside and new trade routes were built with new fortresses and towns along the way. As people converting to Islam had different backgrounds, so the rulers built many prayer areas, called mosques.

Summary

The Muslim rule in India started with the establishment of the Delhi Sultanate in 1206. Their control was limited to the fortified towns which depended on the areas beyond for supplies. When the areas on the outskirts refused to trade supplies, the rulers often plundered their own regions to obtain supplies for the fortified towns.

Under the reign of Ghiyasuddin Balban, Alauddin Khalji and Mohammed bin Tughluq the control was expanded over all the fortified towns and the areas surrounding them.

During 1296 to 1351, the Sultans conquered the external frontiers. The control of the Sultans had reached South India where they added elephants, horses to their armies, captured slaves and collected precious metal from the conquered regions.

Hunters-gatherers and nomadic herders were expelled from the forest. This land was cleared for farming and distributed amongst the peasants and agriculture. Regional trade was promoted alongside and new trade routes were built with new fortresses and towns along the way. As people converting to Islam had different backgrounds, so the rulers built many prayer areas, called mosques.

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