Notes On Introduction to Conjunctions - CBSE Class 9 English Grammar

A conjunction is a word which connects two words or clauses or sentences and shows the relation between them.

EXAMPLE:

1.Dinesh saw a dog on the road. He decided to keep it as pet. Dinesh brought the dog home.
   Dinesh saw a dog on the road and decided to keep it as a pet, so he brought the dog home.

Here ‘and’ and ‘so’ are conjunctions which are used to join the sentences and show the relation between them.


There are three main categories of conjunctions that are explained below. Apart from these, there are also Adverbs of Conjunctions.

1.Coordinate Conjunctions
   Coordinate conjunctions are normally used to join like with like. (In other words they join a noun with                another noun, an adjective with another adjective, and an adverb with another adverb, etc.) The most              common ones are and, but and or.

2. Correlative Conjunctions
   Correlative conjunctions are used in pairs to join alternatives or equal elements. The most common pairs are          either/or, neither/nor, and not only/but also.

3. Subordinate Conjunctions
     Subordinate conjunctions are used to join subordinate clauses to main clauses. Common examples are                  although, because, since, unless, until, and while. 

Summary

A conjunction is a word which connects two words or clauses or sentences and shows the relation between them.

EXAMPLE:

1.Dinesh saw a dog on the road. He decided to keep it as pet. Dinesh brought the dog home.
   Dinesh saw a dog on the road and decided to keep it as a pet, so he brought the dog home.

Here ‘and’ and ‘so’ are conjunctions which are used to join the sentences and show the relation between them.


There are three main categories of conjunctions that are explained below. Apart from these, there are also Adverbs of Conjunctions.

1.Coordinate Conjunctions
   Coordinate conjunctions are normally used to join like with like. (In other words they join a noun with                another noun, an adjective with another adjective, and an adverb with another adverb, etc.) The most              common ones are and, but and or.

2. Correlative Conjunctions
   Correlative conjunctions are used in pairs to join alternatives or equal elements. The most common pairs are          either/or, neither/nor, and not only/but also.

3. Subordinate Conjunctions
     Subordinate conjunctions are used to join subordinate clauses to main clauses. Common examples are                  although, because, since, unless, until, and while. 

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